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ROTAROD
(Model: LE8205 - For 5 mice)
Rotarod provides an easy way to test the motor activity in rodents (mouse or rat) - an ideal solution for studying central nervous system damage, disease effects on motor activity, drugs administration, fatigue resistance, etc. Now even easier to use! The new touchscreen graphic user interface allows clear visualization of timing and speed for each lane. Change modes, adjust speed, and create protocols right from the main screen for greater flexibility with maximum functionality and usability.

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IGBMC ILKIRCH (France)
INSERM GENOPOLE EVRY (France)
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IPSEN BEAUFOUR LES ULIS (France)
INSTITUT PIERRE FABRE TOURS & CASTRES (France)
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! NEW RESEARCH WORK ! A recent publication by L Garrett, L Becker, J Rozman, O Puk, T Stoeger, A. Yildrim, A. Bohla, O. Eickelberg, W. Hans, C. Prehn, J. Adamski, T. Klopstock, I. Racz, A. Zimmer, M. Klingenspor, H. Fuchs, V. Gailus-Durner, W. Wurst, M. Hrabe de Angelis, J. Graw, S. Holter in "Molecular Neurobiology" highlights the merits of using Bioseb's Rotarod: Fgf9Y162C Mutation Alters Information Processing and Social Memory in Mice

Fgf9Y162C Mutation Alters Information Processing and Social Memory in Mice
L Garrett, L Becker, J Rozman, O Puk, T Stoeger, A. Yildrim, A. Bohla, O. Eickelberg, W. Hans, C. Prehn, J. Adamski, T. Klopstock, I. Racz, A. Zimmer, M. Klingenspor, H. Fuchs, V. Gailus-Durner, W. Wurst, M. Hrabe de Angelis, J. Graw, S. Holter
Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Mouse Clinic, Neuherberg, Germany
Published in "Molecular Neurobiology" (2017-07-10)


In neuropsychiatric diseases, such as major depression and anxiety, pathogenic vulnerability is partially dictated by a genetic predisposition. The search continues to define this genetic susceptibility and establish new genetic elements as potential therapeutic targets. The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) could be interesting in this regard. This family of signaling molecules plays important roles in development while also functioning within the adult. This includes effects on aspects of brain function such as neurogenesis and synapse formation. Of this family, Fgf9 is expressed in the adult brain, but its functional role is less well defined. In this study, we examined the role of Fgf9 in different brain functions by analyzing the behavior of Fgf9 Y162C mutant mice, an Fgf9 allele without the confounding systemic effects of other Fgf9 genetic models. Here, we show that this mutation caused altered locomotor and exploratory reactivity to novel, mildly stressful environments. In addition, mutants showed heightened acoustic startle reactivity as well as impaired social discrimination memory. Notably, there was a substantial decrease in the level of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis with no difference in hippocampal neurogenesis. Collectively, our findings indicate a role for the Fgf9 Y162C mutation in information processing and perception of aversive situations as well as in social memory. Thus, genetic alterations in Fgf9 could increase vulnerability to developing neuropsychiatric disease, and we propose the Fgf9 Y162C mutant mice as a valuable tool to study the predictive etiological aspects.
Presentation

The Rotarod is a standard test of motor coordination, balance and fatigue in rodents. It provides an easy way to test the effects of drugs, brain damage, or diseases on motor coordination or fatigue resistance in rodents.

Now even easier to use! The new touchscreen graphic user interface allows clear visualization of timing and speed for each lane. Change modes, adjust speed, and create protocols right from the main screen for greater flexibility with maximum functionality and usability.

Operating principle

The animal is placed on the rotating lane of the Rota Rod and the timer is started. When the animal drops safely into its own lane, the time latency to fall (minutes and seconds) and rotation speed are automatically recorded. A removable upper separator for rat models is included in models LE8305 and LE8505 (4 rats models) to prevent interference between animals running in adjacent lanes.

The ROTAROD is controlled by an advanced microprocessor which provides precise timing control and accurate speed regulation. Rotation can be electronically set at a constant speed (4-40 rpm) using a dial on the front panel. Alternatively, acceleration rate may be selected at a defined time (30 sec., 1, 2, 5 or 10 min). Acquired data is saved with the form of table lanes/trials.

The BIOSEB ROTAROD can also be used with the optional SEDACOM (new version available!) computer interface providing an easy and convenient way to visualize and export the data on a computer for further analysis through RS 232/USB communication.

Bioseb's Rotarod for rats and mice: the new touch screen display
Bioseb's Rotarod for rats and mice: the new touch screen display
Parameters measured:

• Animal latency to fall
• Rotation speed when fall occurs

Key features

• NEW Touchscreen User Interface
• Mechanical detection of fall
• Individual lane timers
• Electronic rod speed adjustment: constant speed and fixed acceleration rate
• Automatic recording of latencies to fall and rotation speed
• Mice and rats combined Rotarod available
• New ROTAROD solution for big rat (>500 grams)

Domains of application:

• Effects of drugs
• Brain damage
• Effects of diseases on motor coordination
• Fatigue resistance in rodents.
• Studies on components of neurons mediating the effects of chemicals
• Testing of genetic knockout animals (KO)
• Mammalian balance and coordination

Three models are available

• LE8205 (5 mice)
• LE8305 (4 rats)
• LE8505 (4 rats or 4 mice, only changing the central drum)
• LE8355 (2 large rats)

A removable upper separator is included in the LE8305 and LE8505, avoiding interference between animals running in adjacent lanes
LE8505 comes with 2 drums, 1 for Rats, 1 for Mice. The drum for mice includes spacers to reduce the lane width to 50mm



Publications (Click on an article to show details and read the abstract)

PAIN
- General pain -
The novel inhibitor of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex, BIM-46187, elicits anti-hyperalgesic properties and synergizes with morphine. (2008)
The novel inhibitor of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex, BIM-46187, elicits anti-hyperalgesic properties and synergizes with morphine.
C. Favre-Guilmard, H. Zeroual-Hider, C. Soulard, C. Touvay, P.-E. Chabrier et al.
Ipsen-Institut Henri Beaufour, Les Ulis, France.
Published in "European Journal of Pharmacology" (2008-10-10)

BIM-46187 (7-[2-amino-1-oxo-3-thio-propyl]-8-cyclohexylmethyl-2-phenyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-imidazo-[1,2a]-pyrazine dimer, hydrochloride) is an inhibitor of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex signalling. Since many mediators of pain act through G-protein coupled receptors, the anti-hyperalgesic effects of BIM-46187 were assessed on experimental models of pain. In addition since opioids are widely used in pain management and act through specific G-protein-coupled receptors, the effects of BIM-46187 on the analgesic properties of morphine have also been investigated. BIM-46187 elicited a dose dependent analgesic effect in the models of carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia (0.1–1 mg/kg; i.v.) and chronic constriction injury (0.3–3 mg/kg; i.v.) in rats. BIM-46187, however, up to 10 mg/kg did not modify the paw oedema induced by carrageenan excluding an anti-inflammatory effect. In addition, at these doses, the compound was not sedative as shown by the lack of effect on the motor performance in the rotarod test. The combination of BIM-46187 and morphine (ratio 1/1) resulted in an unexpected synergistic effect in the model of carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia and in the chronic constriction injury model in rats when evaluated by isobolographic analysis. This synergy allowed a reduction of at least 20 fold in the dose of each compound. Conversely, the drug combination did not increase the side effects of morphine as assessed in the rotarod test. In conclusion, BIM-46187 elicits a potent anti-hyperalgesic effect and strongly synergizes with morphine. This work highlights the role of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes in pain and supports further investigations of the use of BIM-46187 alone, or in combination with low doses of morphine, in the management of pain.

- Mechanical allodynia & hyperlagesia -
Different antinociceptive effects of botulinum toxin type A in inflammatory and peripheral polyneuropathic rat models. (2009)
Different antinociceptive effects of botulinum toxin type A in inflammatory and peripheral polyneuropathic rat models.
C. Favre-Guilmard, M. Auguet, P.-E. Chabrier.
Ipsen Innovation 5, Les Ulis, France.
Published in "European Journal of Pharmacology" (2009-09-01)

In addition to inhibition of acetylcholine release in the neuromuscular junction botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) also inhibits the release of mediators involved in pain perception. We have investigated the effect of two types of BoNT-A on mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat models of carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia and of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. A subplantar (s.p.) injection of BoNT-A in the ipsilateral hindpaw 3 days before carrageenan administration reduced hypersensitivity. Dysport® and Botox® elicited comparable antihyperalgesic effects. Dysport® up to 30 U/kg and Botox® up to 20 U/kg did not impair the rat withdrawal nociceptive reflex or the locomotor performance as assessed by the rotarod test. Intraperitoneal administration of the skeletal muscle relaxant dantrolene produced, in contrast to BoNT-A, more motor impairment than analgesia. Paclitaxel treatment resulted in a peripheral neuropathy that affected the two hindpaws. Injection of 20 U/kg (s.p.) Dysport® produced a significant antihyperalgesic effect in the injected paw of neuropathic animals 3 days after administration. Unexpectedly, a similar analgesic effect was observed in the contralateral paw. The same results were also observed when Botox® was used instead of Dysport®. In contrast, a contralateral administration of Dysport® in the carrageenan test was ineffective. We conclude that BoNT-A elicits antinociceptive effects independent of the effects on muscular relaxation. Our results suggest that different mechanisms of action are responsible for the effect of BoNT-A in inflammatory and peripheral polyneuropathic rat models.

- Inflammatory pain -
Specific involvement of atypical PKC_/PKM_ in spinal persistent nociceptive processing following peripheral inflammation in rat. (2011)
Specific involvement of atypical PKC_/PKM_ in spinal persistent nociceptive processing following peripheral inflammation in rat.
F. Marchand, R. D'Mello, P. Yip, M. Calvo, E. Muller et al
King's College London, Wolfson Centre for Age-related Diseases, Neurorestoration Group, London, United Kingdom.
Published in "Molecular Pain" (2011-11-05)

BACKGROUND: Central sensitization requires the activation of various intracellular signalling pathways within spinal dorsal horn neurons, leading to a lowering of activation threshold and enhanced responsiveness of these cells. Such plasticity contributes to the manifestation of chronic pain states and displays a number of features of long-term potentiation (LTP), a ubiquitous neuronal mechanism of increased synaptic strength. Here we describe the role of a novel pathway involving atypical PKC_/PKM_ in persistent spinal nociceptive processing, previously implicated in the maintenance of late-phase LTP. RESULTS: Using both behavioral tests and in vivo electrophysiology in rats, we show that inhibition of this pathway, via spinal delivery of a myristoylated protein kinase C-_ pseudo-substrate inhibitor, reduces both pain-related behaviors and the activity of deep dorsal horn wide dynamic range neurons (WDRs) following formalin administration. In addition, Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was also reduced by inhibition of PKC_/PKM_ activity. Importantly, this inhibition did not affect acute pain or locomotor behavior in normal rats and interestingly, did not inhibited mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats. Pain-related behaviors in both inflammatory models coincided with increased phosphorylation of PKC_/PKM_ in dorsal horn neurons, specifically PKM_ phosphorylation in formalin rats. Finally, inhibition of PKC_/PKM_ activity decreased the expression of Fos in response to formalin and CFA in both superficial and deep laminae of the dorsal horn. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that PKC_, especially PKM_ isoform, is a significant factor involved in spinal persistent nociceptive processing, specifically, the manifestation of chronic pain states following peripheral inflammation.

- Neuropathic pain -
Mature Purkinje Cells Require the Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptor-α (RORα) to Maintain Climbing Fiber Mono-Innervation and Other Adult Characteristics (2013)
Mature Purkinje Cells Require the Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptor-α (RORα) to Maintain Climbing Fiber Mono-Innervation and Other Adult Characteristics
XR.Chen , N. Heck, AM. Lohof, C. Rochefort, MP. More et al
UPMC Université Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7102, Paris, France,
Published in "The Journal of Neuroscience" (2013-05-29)

Neuronal maturation during development is a multistep process regulated by transcription factors. The transcription factor RORα (retinoic acid-related orphan receptor α) is necessary for early Purkinje cell (PC) maturation but is also expressed throughout adulthood. To identify the role of RORα in mature PCs, we used Cre-lox mouse genetic tools in vivo that delete it specifically from PCs between postnatal days 10–21. Up to 14 d of age, differences between mutant and control PCs were not detectable: both were mono-innervated by climbing fibers (CFs) extending along their well-developed dendrites with spiny branchlets. By week 4, mutant mice were ataxic, some PCs had died, and remaining PC soma and dendrites were atrophic, with almost complete disappearance of spiny branchlets. The innervation pattern of surviving RORα-deleted PCs was abnormal with several immature characteristics. Notably, multiple functional CF innervation was reestablished on these mature PCs, simultaneously with the relocation of CF contacts to the PC soma and their stem dendrite. This morphological modification of CF contacts could be induced even later, using lentivirus-mediated depletion of rora from adult PCs. These data show that the late postnatal expression of RORα cell-autonomously regulates the maintenance of PC dendritic complexity, and the CF innervation status of the PC (dendritic vs somatic contacts, and mono-innervation vs multi-innervation). Thus, the differentiation state of adult neurons is under the control of transcription factors; and in their absence, adult neurons lose their mature characteristics and acquire some characteristics of an earlier developmental stage.

N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-mediated modulations of the anti-allodynic effects of 5-HT1B/1D receptor stimulation in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. (2011)
N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-mediated modulations of the anti-allodynic effects of 5-HT1B/1D receptor stimulation in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain.
V. Kayser, A. Latrémolière, M. Hamon, S. Bourgoin.
Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Neuropsychopharmacology, Paris, France.
Published in "European Journal of Pain" (2011-05-20)

Previous studies showed that triptans and other 5-HT(1B/1D)-receptor agonists attenuate hyper-responsiveness to mechanical stimulation of the face in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, probably by activating 5-HT(1B/1D)-receptors on primary afferent nociceptive fibers. We now tested whether blockade of post-synaptic receptors for the excitatory amino acid glutamate released by these fibers would increase this action. We thus evaluated whether (±)1-hydroxy-3-aminopyrrolidine-2-one (HA-966), an antagonist at the glycine/D-serine site of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptors, would potentiate the anti-allodynic action of dihydroergotamine and zolmitriptan in rats with chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Complementary studies were performed with other NMDA-receptor ligands and in rats with chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI-SN) for comparison. Injury was produced by loose ligatures of the nerves. Responsiveness to mechanical stimulation (vibrissae or hindpaw territories) with von Frey filaments was used to evaluate allodynia 2 weeks after nerve ligature. Rats received NMDA-receptor ligands or saline 20 min before dihydroergotamine (25-100 _g/kg, i.v.) or zolmitriptan (25-100 _g/kg, s.c.). HA-966 (2.5mg/kg, s.c.), inactive on its own, enhanced the anti-allodynic effects of dihydroergotamine (eightfold increase) and zolmitriptan (threefold increase) in CCI-ION rats, but these drugs exerted no effects in allodynic CCI-SN rats. NMDA-receptor blockade by memantine (5mg/kg, i.p.) also enhanced, whereas activation at glycine/NMDA site by D-cycloserine (3mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the anti-allodynic properties of zolmitriptan in CCI-ION rats. Combined administration of NMDA-receptor antagonist and 5-HT(1B/1D)-receptor agonist may be a promising approach for alleviating trigeminal neuropathic pain.

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM (CNS)
- Ischemic Strokes -
Effects of stromal cell-derived factor 1_ delivered at different phases of transient focal ischemia in rats. (2012)
Effects of stromal cell-derived factor 1_ delivered at different phases of transient focal ischemia in rats.
J. Yoo, J.-J. Seo, J.-H. Eom, D.-Y. Hwang.
CHA University, College of Natural Science, Department of Biomedical Science, Seoul, Korea.
Published in "Neuroscience" (2012-05-03)

Endogenous stromal cell-derived factor 1_ (SDF1_) has been implicated in postischemic tissue repair, suggesting SDF1_ as a potential therapeutic molecule to treat stroke patients. In spite of its potential, no data are available regarding the short- and long-term effects of SDF1_ when it is delivered at different phases of stroke. In our study, adenovirus expressing SDF1_ gene (AV-SDF1_) was introduced into the boundary of the infarcted area either 3 days before or 1 week after ischemia, and behavioral performance was measured over 5 weeks. Immediate behavioral and structural amelioration was evident when AV-SDF1_ was injected 3 days before ischemia, which might be the result of SDF1_-mediated neuroprotection as supported by the TUNEL staining and Western blot analysis of active caspase-3. In addition, increase in neurogenesis, neuroblast migration, and neural differentiation was also apparent in the AV-SDF1_-injected brain, which contributed to further amelioration at later time points (delayed response). On the contrary, when AV-SDF1_ was introduced 1 week post-ischemia (in the subacute phase), significant behavioral recovery became apparent beginning 5 weeks after viral delivery. Taken together, the therapeutic efficacy of SDF1_ varied considerably depending on when SDF1_ overexpression was initiated; initiating SDF1_ overexpression before ischemia exerted both immediate and delayed beneficial effects, whereas initiating overexpression in the subacute phase exerted only a delayed response.



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Model LE8205 LE8305 LE8505 LE8355
Subject weight range up to 60g up to 300/400g up to 60g - mouse drum
up to 350/400g - rat drum
>350/400g
up to 500/600g
Base Unit Dimensions mm (inch) (W x D x H) 362 x 240 x 375 (14.25 x 9.45 x 14.75) 362 x 240 x 375 (14.25 x 9.45 x 14.75) 362 x 240 x 375 (14.25 x 9.45 x 14.75) 362 x 245 x 624 (14.25 x 9.65 x 24.57)
Total Height mm (inch) 400 (15.75) 400 (15.75) 400 (15.75) 649 (25.55)
Fall Height cm 20 21.5 20 (mouse drum)
21.5 (rat drum)
47
Lane Width mm (inch) 50 (2) 75 (3) 50 (2) - mouse drum
75 (3) - rat drum
153 (6)
Drum Diameter mm (inch) 250 (9.8) 250 (9.8) 250 (9.8) 250 (9.8)
Rod Diameter mm (inch) 30 (1) 60 (2) 30 (1) - mouse drum
60 (2) - rat drum
80 (3)
Extra Hood Height mm (inch) NA 130 (5) 130 (5) 130 (5)
Constant Speeds 4-40 RPM 4-40 RPM 4-40 RPM 4-40 RPM
Acceleration Rate 30 seconds to 10 minutes with 1 sec increments 30 seconds to 10 minutes with 1 sec increments 30 seconds to 10 minutes with 1 sec increments 30 seconds to 10 minutes with 1 sec increments
Material Composition Methacrylate, arnite (lanes) Methacrylate, arnite (lanes) Methacrylate, arnite (lanes) Methacrylate, arnite (lanes)

Model:
LE8205
Rotarod (Modif.)
For 5 mice Contact us

Related products:
BIO-GS3
Contact us
LE8305
For 4 rats Contact us
LE8505
For 4 rats or 4 mice Contact us
LE8355
For 2 big rats Contact us

Accessories :
SEDACOM
Contact us
LE7000
Thermal Printer (Modif.)
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CONRS232USB
RS232/USB converter (Modif.)
Contact us
LE8580
Rota Rod - 4 rats cylinder (Modif.)
Contact us
LE8550
Rota Rod - 4 mice cylinder (Modif.)
Contact us
LE8290
Rota Rod - 5 mice cylinder (Modif.)
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