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INFRARED THERMOMETER
(Model: BIO-IRB153)
Very fast and contactless, infrared temperature measurement for small rodents (mouse and rat) - specially design to allow measurements on small surface, like the tail of a mouse, with high accuracy and repeatability.

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  • CEPHALON INC West Chester Pa, Etats-Unis
  • UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA Chapel Hill NC, Etats-Unis
  • UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Philadelphia, Etats-Unis
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! NEW RESEARCH WORK ! A recent publication by Urien L, Gaillard S, Lo Re L, Malapert P, Bohic M, Reynders A, Moqrich A in "Scientific Reports" highlights the merits of using Bioseb's Infrared thermometer: Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain.

Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain.
Urien L, Gaillard S, Lo Re L, Malapert P, Bohic M, Reynders A, Moqrich A
"Aix-Marseille-Université, Institut de Biologie du Développement de Marseille, Marseille, France "
Published in "Scientific Reports" (2017-02-17)


Primary sensory neurons are heterogeneous by myriad of molecular criteria. However, the functional significance of this remarkable heterogeneity is just emerging. We precedently described the GINIP(+) neurons as a new subpopulation of non peptidergic C-fibers encompassing the free nerve ending cutaneous MRGPRD(+) neurons and C-LTMRs. Using our recently generated ginip mouse model, we have been able to selectively ablate the GINIP(+) neurons and assess their functional role in the somatosensation. We found that ablation of GINIP(+) neurons affected neither the molecular contents nor the central projections of the spared neurons. GINIP-DTR mice exhibited impaired sensation to gentle mechanical stimuli applied to their hairy skin and had normal responses to noxious mechanical stimuli applied to their glabrous skin, under acute and injury-induced conditions. Importantly, loss of GINIP(+) neurons significantly altered formalin-evoked first pain and drastically suppressed the second pain response. Given that MRGPRD(+) neurons have been shown to be dispensable for formalin-evoked pain, our study suggest that C-LTMRs play a critical role in the modulation of formalin-evoked pain.
Bioseb's Infrared thermometer for rodents (rats and mice)

Bioseb's Infrared thermometer
for rodents (rats and mice)

Presentation

The 153-IRB Infrared Thermometer was designed to measure cutaneous temperature of small rodents (mouse and rat) very fast and contactless. It is a reliable and non-invasive method to measure the skin temperature and can then be correlated to the rectal temperature.

With the 153-IRB Infrared Thermometer, we especially focused on the optical dimension and the position of the IR sensor in order to allow measurements on very small surfaces without allowing the sensor to get wrong values with integration of environment temperature, which can be the case with other industrial type infrared thermometers. This thermometer thus allows easy measurements even on mice tails - with high accuracy and repeatability.

It is important to emphasize that this thermometer does not replace a rectal one: the cutaneous measurement should be correlated with usual rectal temperatures (see our BRET2 and 3 Rectal Probes for rodents).
In case of doubt about its interest in your applications, do not hesitate to contact us.

The 153-IRB thermometer is especially accurate on a temperature range from 25 to 40 °C and will prove to be useful for other lab applications as well.

Please note that it is impossible to provide correlation tables between skin and rectal temperatures, as the correlation depends on the animals, their stress, etc.

Operating principle

Infrared temperature measurement consists in the detection of the quantity of light energy emitted in the IR wavelength by the measured object - the optical signal received by the sensor being then converted into an electrical signal. The instruments are equipped with a lens to concentrate the light on the sensor. This lenses have different characteristics according to the object you want to measure (diameter, focal length, viewing angle or distance ration between the surface "seen" by the lens and the distance to the object).

Another parameter should be taken into account: the emissivity (or amount of emitted light) of the measured object. The focal specifications of typical general thermometers usually allow the measurement of objects from a minimum distance of 10 to 25 mm with a minimum target size of 15mm and a distance ratio of 1:10, the emissivity is generally fixed to 0,95. Such thermometers are therefore not able to measure from less than 10 mm from the object, and this measurement includes all points in a circle of 15 mm of diameter. If the object is situated 50 cm away, the surface of measurement will have a diameter of 5 cm. Theses dimensions are fully inadequate for cutaneous temperature measurements in rodents, which is precisely the reason why we developed the 153-IRB Thermometer, which offer a measurement diameter small enough for rats and mice tails.

Important notice: measurement taken in the animal fur may include the ambiant air caught in the hair, thus creating important measurement variations. It's therefore advisable to measure on naked surfaces, like skin, tail, nose, genital area...

Key functionalities

• Fast and easy-to-use
• Contactless
• Works for both rats and mice
• High accuracy and repeatability - even on mice tails !
Domains of application

• Pharmacology
• Physiological monitoring


Publications (Click on an article to show details and read the abstract)

PAIN
- General pain -
Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain. (2017)
Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain.
Urien L, Gaillard S, Lo Re L, Malapert P, Bohic M, Reynders A, Moqrich A
"Aix-Marseille-Université, Institut de Biologie du Développement de Marseille, Marseille, France "
Published in "Scientific Reports" (2017-02-17)

Primary sensory neurons are heterogeneous by myriad of molecular criteria. However, the functional significance of this remarkable heterogeneity is just emerging. We precedently described the GINIP(+) neurons as a new subpopulation of non peptidergic C-fibers encompassing the free nerve ending cutaneous MRGPRD(+) neurons and C-LTMRs. Using our recently generated ginip mouse model, we have been able to selectively ablate the GINIP(+) neurons and assess their functional role in the somatosensation. We found that ablation of GINIP(+) neurons affected neither the molecular contents nor the central projections of the spared neurons. GINIP-DTR mice exhibited impaired sensation to gentle mechanical stimuli applied to their hairy skin and had normal responses to noxious mechanical stimuli applied to their glabrous skin, under acute and injury-induced conditions. Importantly, loss of GINIP(+) neurons significantly altered formalin-evoked first pain and drastically suppressed the second pain response. Given that MRGPRD(+) neurons have been shown to be dispensable for formalin-evoked pain, our study suggest that C-LTMRs play a critical role in the modulation of formalin-evoked pain.

- Mechanical allodynia & hyperlagesia -
Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain. (2017)
Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain.
Urien L, Gaillard S, Lo Re L, Malapert P, Bohic M, Reynders A, Moqrich A
"Aix-Marseille-Université, Institut de Biologie du Développement de Marseille, Marseille, France "
Published in "Scientific Reports" (2017-02-17)

Primary sensory neurons are heterogeneous by myriad of molecular criteria. However, the functional significance of this remarkable heterogeneity is just emerging. We precedently described the GINIP(+) neurons as a new subpopulation of non peptidergic C-fibers encompassing the free nerve ending cutaneous MRGPRD(+) neurons and C-LTMRs. Using our recently generated ginip mouse model, we have been able to selectively ablate the GINIP(+) neurons and assess their functional role in the somatosensation. We found that ablation of GINIP(+) neurons affected neither the molecular contents nor the central projections of the spared neurons. GINIP-DTR mice exhibited impaired sensation to gentle mechanical stimuli applied to their hairy skin and had normal responses to noxious mechanical stimuli applied to their glabrous skin, under acute and injury-induced conditions. Importantly, loss of GINIP(+) neurons significantly altered formalin-evoked first pain and drastically suppressed the second pain response. Given that MRGPRD(+) neurons have been shown to be dispensable for formalin-evoked pain, our study suggest that C-LTMRs play a critical role in the modulation of formalin-evoked pain.

SENSORY SYSTEM
- Somatosensory system -
Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain. (2017)
Genetic ablation of GINIP-expressing primary sensory neurons strongly impairs Formalin-evoked pain.
Urien L, Gaillard S, Lo Re L, Malapert P, Bohic M, Reynders A, Moqrich A
"Aix-Marseille-Université, Institut de Biologie du Développement de Marseille, Marseille, France "
Published in "Scientific Reports" (2017-02-17)

Primary sensory neurons are heterogeneous by myriad of molecular criteria. However, the functional significance of this remarkable heterogeneity is just emerging. We precedently described the GINIP(+) neurons as a new subpopulation of non peptidergic C-fibers encompassing the free nerve ending cutaneous MRGPRD(+) neurons and C-LTMRs. Using our recently generated ginip mouse model, we have been able to selectively ablate the GINIP(+) neurons and assess their functional role in the somatosensation. We found that ablation of GINIP(+) neurons affected neither the molecular contents nor the central projections of the spared neurons. GINIP-DTR mice exhibited impaired sensation to gentle mechanical stimuli applied to their hairy skin and had normal responses to noxious mechanical stimuli applied to their glabrous skin, under acute and injury-induced conditions. Importantly, loss of GINIP(+) neurons significantly altered formalin-evoked first pain and drastically suppressed the second pain response. Given that MRGPRD(+) neurons have been shown to be dispensable for formalin-evoked pain, our study suggest that C-LTMRs play a critical role in the modulation of formalin-evoked pain.


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Technical specs At an ambient temperature of 15 to 40 ° C
(ideally 25-40 ° C)
Resolution 0,1°C
Accuracy 0,3°C from 25 to 40°C
Accuracy outside of the 25-40°C range 1% +/- 1°C
Global measurement range -20°C to +200°C
Distance ratio 1:1,5
Min. distance to object From 0 mm
Min. measurement size 3mm
Emissivity Fixed, undisclosed value

Model:
BIO-IRB153
Infrared thermometer (Modif.)
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